Book Review Rhetorical Precis

Derek Mueller

Thesis Prep I

Carol Burns

Book Review Rhetorical Precis

Book:

Pullin, Graham. Design Meets Disability. The MIT Press. Cambridge, Massachusetts. 2009.

In Graham Pullin’s book, Design Meets Disability (2009), Pullin exhibits how design and disability can influence and inspire each other. Pullin accomplishes this by presenting the innovation of glasses, how they first addressed the need for sight due to disabilities and eventually they became a fashion statement, as an inspiration into how items created for disabilities can become an innovative means of design. Pullin’s purpose is to challenge all kinds of designers in order to design with these disabilities in mind and to not let them be a negative but a potential opportunity. The intended audience for this book is anyone as the language is very coherent; however, designers would to gain the most knowledge from this book.

Book Review:

Waloszek, Gerd. SAP User Experience, SAP AG – November 24, 2009.

In Gerd Waloszek’s review of Graham Pullin’s book, Design Meets Disability (2009), Waloszek outlines the intent of the review while expressing a summary as well as the structure of the book. Waloszek achieves this by examining specific claims Pullin makes and connecting them to the thesis of the book. Waloszek’s purpose is to expound upon the idea that there is a large gap between UI design practices and “real” designers in order to show how there are few innovations in such an open market. This review’s audience is one that is interested with design especially in the realm of technology.

Working Sources

Books:

Blesser, Barry, and Linda-Ruth Salter. Spaces Speak, are you Listening?. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press, 2007.

Degenhart, Christine, Johann Ebe, and Oliver Heiss.Barrier-Free Design: Principles, Planning, Examples. Munich: Birkhäuser, 2010.

Devlieger, Patrick, Frank Renders, Hubert Froyen, and Kristel Wilders. Blindness and the Multi-Sensorial City. Antwerp- Apeldoorn: Garant, 2006.

Hersh, Marion, and Michael A. Johnson. Assistive Technology for Visually Impaired and Blind People. London: Springer-Verlag, 2008.

Joffe, Elga. A Practical Guide to the ADA and Visual Impairment. New York: AFB Press, 1999.

Articles:

Bakdash, Jonathan Z., Nicholas A. Giudice, and Gordon E. Legge. “Wayfinding with Words: Spatial Learning and Navigation Using Dynamically Updated Verbal Descriptions.” Psychological Research. no. 71 (2006): 347-358.

Bohuslawky, Maria. “Sightless Enjoy National Gallery Art; Sculpture, Special Reproductions of Paintings now can be Enjoyed Through Touch.”Edmonton Journal. A. 11 (1995).

Gaunet, Florence. “Verbal Guidance Rules for a Localized Wayfinding Aid Intended for Blind-Pedestrians in Urban Areas.” Universal Access in the Information Society. (2006) 4: 328-343.

Rigden, Christine. “‘The Eye of the Beholder’ Designing for Color-Blind Users.” British Telecommunications Engineering, January 1999.

Book Review Rhetorical Precis

Book:

Pullin, Graham. Design Meets Disability. The MIT Press. Cambridge, Massachusetts. 2009.

 

Graham Pullin’s book, Design Meets Disability (2009), Pullin exhibits how design and disability can influence and inspire each other. Pullin accomplishes this by presenting the innovation of glasses, how they first addressed the need for sight with disabilities and eventually they became a fashion statement, as a inspiration into how items created for disabilities can become an innovative means of design. Pullin’s purpose is to challenge all kinds of designers in order to design with these disabilities in mind and to not let them be a negative but a potential opportunity. The intended audience for this book is anyone as the language is very coherent; however, designers seek to gain the most knowledge from this book.

 

Book Review:

Waloszek, Gerd. SAP User Experience, SAP AG – November 24, 2009.

 

 

Gerd Waloszek’s review of Graham Pullin’s book, Design Meets Disability (2009), Waloszek outlines the intent of the review while expressing a summary as well as the structure of the book. Waloszek achieves this by examining specific claims Pullin makes and connecting them to the thesis of the book. Waloszek’s purpose is to expound upon the idea that there is a large gap between UI design practices and “real” designers in order to show how there are few innovations in such an open market. This review’s audience is one that is interested with design especially in the realm of technology.

Participation Through Time and Space – Contemporary Discourses Assigment

Participation Through Time and Space

Hans Ulrich Obrist and Olafur Eliasson agree with the idea that architectural spaces transform once an individual enters the space. They agree that through spatial conceptions an individual can alter the perceived intention of a space and make it their own. Each writer suggests a particular avenue on how a space can be transformed by a unique contributor. Obrist in “Participation Lasts Forever” uses a curator and how they are producers to the play between the art, architecture, and the user, which in turn transforms the space. Eliasson in “Your Engagement has Consequences” uses time to suggest that through time an individual personalizes a space and through this it transforms. Participation allows for a unique, personal experience altering the space for the user.

In “Participation Lasts Forever,” Obrist strives to display the ongoing, complex dynamic learning system museums can offer (Obrist 14). Obrist mentions Alexander Dorner for the purpose of confirming his ideas. Dorner as a curator believed “the museum [is] in a state of permanent transformation” (14). This ‘elastic museum’ could allow artwork to “extend their tentacles to other works” (14). This ability to bridge the art also protrudes into the experience the users participate in. Obrist also delves into the idea that these bridges create “temporary communities, by connecting different people and practices, and creating the conditions for triggering sparks between them” (16). Within these communities each user has a role in the context of the performance of the space. Orbist also expounds upon the idea that a successful space encourages participation. Spaces that remain unnoticed are ones that everyone agrees upon, and lacks participation through questioning, movement, and connecting to the users. Participation for Obrist, creates an experience that is timeless and last forever. With successful incorporation of interaction through theoretical questioning or physical motion, a user will create a timeless connection to the space.

In “Your Engagement has Consequences,” Eliasson unlike Obrist, urges that user engagement is impacted not only through the production created by the art and architect, but also through time. Eliasson begins by stating that everything is situated within a process – everything is in motion (Eliasson 1). He embraces the idea that time plays a major factor in our perception of a given space and how we interact with other people. He recognizes “objects as timeless,” for a physical structure is static and only changes appearance and meaning through time. Eliasson builds a model for how a project should or could become an individual experience where a user’s participation creates a consequence upon the space. This model embodies how a idea develops from conception to lived space. Eliasson believed that starting with an idea an application of form then has to commence. He states that the form becomes the ‘carrier’ of the content (1). Once this carrier is conceived, communicating the idea is of the upmost importance. Now time enters into the project. With a space built and expressing an idea, the user now experiences the space. However, the most important element about this experience, Eliasson argues, is time. Time becomes more attractive to discuss. ‘Your time’ and ‘my time’ can be completely different when experiencing a space. This spurs what Eliasson classifies as YES, or Your Engagement Sequence. “YES attunes our attention to time, movement and changeability” (2). This then leads to the idea that YES leads towards consequences. Eliasson argues, “If we accept and implement the relativity of so-called truth by using YES, a general sense of responsibility in our relationship to our surroundings may be achieved… engagement has consequences and these entail a heightened feeling of responsibility” (2). Eliasson offers the example of the street, a space that is a performance of everyday life that is very dependent on time. “We could call our relationship with space one of co-production: when someone walks down a street she co-produces the spatiality of the street and is simultaneously co-produced by it” (2). Time constitutes a major aspect towards a production of space. This participation in the performance of the space inherently transforms the space for the user.

Participation allows for a unique, personal experience altering the space for the user. Obrist and Eliasson both see the connection between the space and the user; however, they differ on how this participation is constructed. While Obrist adheres to the idea that participation of a space is a production constructed by the curator, Eliasson believes that time engages the participation of a user on a space’s performance. Regardless of the two different approaches, the main concept that participation through time and space creates a reciprocal effect between the user and the art and architecture. This then transforms the space into an experience that was created through participation.